All posts in Policy

Apple’s Policy on LCD Screen Dead Pixels Gets Outed

Apple dead pixel policy
(Image courtesy of BGR)

If you have any Apple device with a screen, you’ve probably feared what might happen should the unit develop a dead pixel or three. As it turns out, Cupertino has a policy in place which has just been made public, used to decide if the unit should be repaired or replaced,

BGR got their hands on “Apple’s internal policy on acceptable numbers of pixel anomalies,” which was recently updated according to one of their sources. The screenshot above is used as a guideline by Apple Store Geniues in order to address repair issues involving a display.

“It essentially allows them to quickly and easily determine whether or not to repair or replace products with display defects,” the BGR report explains. “Apple provides its employees with a table showing the acceptable number of pixel anomalies for each product range.”

It would appear that the smaller the display, the more Apple is willing to address the problem. BGR uses the example of the iPhone and iPod, for which one single pixel anomaly is enough to get the unit repaired or even replaced, while the MacBook Air can have up to three light pixels, five dark pixels or a total of seven combined anomalies before they’re eligible for service.

However, even if the number of pixel anomalies are within the acceptable range, an Apple Genius has the option to exchange your afflicted product for another — but the bad news is, if the exchange unit also has anomalies within their acceptable range, you’re basically stuck with it. Good to know!

Follow this article’s author, J.R. Bookwalter on Twitter

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Apple's Policy Changes Could Have Been Result of FTC Investigation [Updated]

Since Apple’s big policy changes in app development yesterday, software developers have been jumping for joy at the freedom to build their own applications with whatever tool they well choose. However, the Wall Street Journal reports that Apple’s change in policy on its third party app development may have a little something to do with being under fire from the FTC.

WSJ says that this could have all taken place around June, when the FTC launched an investigation to figure out whether or not Apple had violated antitrust laws with its earlier, more restrictive, policy. It’s not clear if Apple’s statements yesterday had anything to do with this alleged investigate.

Still, the revised policy has its fair share of restrictions as well. iOS device users are still not be able to use Flash on their mobile devices. The only major change in policy is that developers are now allowed to use Flash-based software to piece together their apps and can use other types of programming languages.

There is also some speculation that Apple’s relaxed position could also have to do with pressure to compete with Google’s Android Market, since the Android mobile operating system is now making its way to tablets. Jeffrey Hammond, an analyst with technology firm Forrester Research, said in the WSJ article that some developers are beginning to develop apps with Android Market first so that they can actually reel in some cash while they’re waiting to get in through the final stages of Apple’s approval process. 

Regardless of what the real reason is for Apple’s new policy, it’s undoubtedly welcome by developers, especially the ones that have had to cut down on features in their app because they’ve been denied time and time again.

Follow this article’s author, Florence Ion, on Twitter.

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Apple's Policy Changes Could Have Been Result of FCC Investigation

Since Apple’s big policy changes in app development yesterday, software developers have been jumping for joy at the freedom to build their own applications with whatever tool they well choose. However, the Wall Street Journal reports that Apple’s change in policy on its third party app development may have a little something to do with being under fire from the FCC.

WSJ says that this could have all taken place around June, when the FCC launched an investigation to figure out whether or not Apple had violated antitrust laws with its earlier, more restrictive, policy. It’s not clear if Apple’s statements yesterday had anything to do with this alleged investigate.

Still, the revised policy has its fair share of restrictions as well. iOS device users are still not be able to use Flash on their mobile devices. The only major change in policy is that developers are now allowed to use Flash-based software to piece together their apps and can use other types of programming languages.

There is also some speculation that Apple’s relaxed position could also have to do with pressure to compete with Google’s Android Market, since the Android mobile operating system is now making its way to tablets. Jeffrey Hammond, an analyst with technology firm Forrester Research, said in the WSJ article that some developers are beginning to develop apps with Android Market first so that they can actually reel in some cash while they’re waiting to get in through the final stages of Apple’s approval process. 

Regardless of what the real reason is for Apple’s new policy, it’s undoubtedly welcome by developers, especially the ones that have had to cut down on features in their app because they’ve been denied time and time again.

Follow this article’s author, Florence Ion, on Twitter.

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