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Donkey Kong World Record Changes Hands For Third Time

donkeykong

(Image courtesy of krakenkiller.webs.com)

Yes, it was indeed “on, like Donkey Kong.”  Twin Galaxies announced that the World Record for the video game classic switched hands for a third time this year, with former champion Steve Wiebe reclaiming honors with 1,064,500 points.  Can ‘ya top that?

The record last went to Wiebe back in the spring of 2007, but he was later topped by Billy Mitchell months later.  Mitchell’s score would then fall to New York’s Hank Chien this past March.  Wiebe had tried to pluck back the record at various live events throughout the years, but he would then record his score on August 30, and then submitted it to Twin Galaxies.  Twin Galaxies would then verify Wiebe’s score today as being the new World Record.

Who is Twin Galaxies International?

They were founded in Ottumwa by Walter Day in 1981, and are considered the world’s official authority on player rankings, gaming statistics and championship tournaments and operate out of the their international corporate offices located in Manchester, New Hampshire.

TGI is home to over 120,000 verified scores from over 52,000 members around the world, and are recognized by Guiness World Records, G4tv, as well as various other media outlets as the only official organization for video game record keeping.

For more info about the organization, head here.

Via Twin Galaxies International

Follow this article’s author, Matthew Tilmann on Twitter

 

 

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Apple's Policy Changes Could Have Been Result of FTC Investigation [Updated]

Since Apple’s big policy changes in app development yesterday, software developers have been jumping for joy at the freedom to build their own applications with whatever tool they well choose. However, the Wall Street Journal reports that Apple’s change in policy on its third party app development may have a little something to do with being under fire from the FTC.

WSJ says that this could have all taken place around June, when the FTC launched an investigation to figure out whether or not Apple had violated antitrust laws with its earlier, more restrictive, policy. It’s not clear if Apple’s statements yesterday had anything to do with this alleged investigate.

Still, the revised policy has its fair share of restrictions as well. iOS device users are still not be able to use Flash on their mobile devices. The only major change in policy is that developers are now allowed to use Flash-based software to piece together their apps and can use other types of programming languages.

There is also some speculation that Apple’s relaxed position could also have to do with pressure to compete with Google’s Android Market, since the Android mobile operating system is now making its way to tablets. Jeffrey Hammond, an analyst with technology firm Forrester Research, said in the WSJ article that some developers are beginning to develop apps with Android Market first so that they can actually reel in some cash while they’re waiting to get in through the final stages of Apple’s approval process. 

Regardless of what the real reason is for Apple’s new policy, it’s undoubtedly welcome by developers, especially the ones that have had to cut down on features in their app because they’ve been denied time and time again.

Follow this article’s author, Florence Ion, on Twitter.

News

Apple's Policy Changes Could Have Been Result of FCC Investigation

Since Apple’s big policy changes in app development yesterday, software developers have been jumping for joy at the freedom to build their own applications with whatever tool they well choose. However, the Wall Street Journal reports that Apple’s change in policy on its third party app development may have a little something to do with being under fire from the FCC.

WSJ says that this could have all taken place around June, when the FCC launched an investigation to figure out whether or not Apple had violated antitrust laws with its earlier, more restrictive, policy. It’s not clear if Apple’s statements yesterday had anything to do with this alleged investigate.

Still, the revised policy has its fair share of restrictions as well. iOS device users are still not be able to use Flash on their mobile devices. The only major change in policy is that developers are now allowed to use Flash-based software to piece together their apps and can use other types of programming languages.

There is also some speculation that Apple’s relaxed position could also have to do with pressure to compete with Google’s Android Market, since the Android mobile operating system is now making its way to tablets. Jeffrey Hammond, an analyst with technology firm Forrester Research, said in the WSJ article that some developers are beginning to develop apps with Android Market first so that they can actually reel in some cash while they’re waiting to get in through the final stages of Apple’s approval process. 

Regardless of what the real reason is for Apple’s new policy, it’s undoubtedly welcome by developers, especially the ones that have had to cut down on features in their app because they’ve been denied time and time again.

Follow this article’s author, Florence Ion, on Twitter.

News